NewEnglandTravelPlanner.com Logo   Columbus Day in New England
This mid-October long weekend is among the busiest for New England tourism.

 

 

First celebrated in New York City on October 12, 1792, Columbus Day commemorates Captain Christopher Columbus's landfall in the New World at the Bahamas in 1492.

In New England, Columbus Day, a national holiday celebrated on the second Monday in October, makes a long weekend that is traditionally considered the height of New England's fall foliage season.

New Englanders pour out of the cities, visitors come from around the world, and special excursion trains and buses packed with "leaf peepers" cruise through the countryside to enjoy the brilliant reds, oranges, yellows and browns of the region's forests of maple, beech, birch and other deciduous trees.

Along with August and Labor Day, foliage season and Columbus Day are the busiest tourism times in New England.

If you plan to travel here from early to late October—and especially on Columbus Day weekendmake your lodging and transportation reservations as early as possible!

If you have no reservations, you may still be able to find a place to stay, but it may not be of the type, or in the location, that you prefer. Here are tips on how to find rooms.

Columbus Day is not the end of foliage season—and may not even be at the "peak color" of the season. Don't think that you must be in New England on Columbus Day weekend to enjoy good foliage color.

Peak color usually begins first in the relatively colder climate of mountainous northern New England and slowly spreads southward, coming much later to the warm shores of Long Island Sound.

It may begin in the north in mid- or late September, and the wave of color finally fade from the southern New England shores of Connecticut and Rhode Island by mid-November. More...



Fall Foliage in New England

October in New England

November in New England

Tom's New England Almanac

When to Visit New England

 

 

Fall Foliage, Concord MA

Spectacular maple foliage shades a colonial-era cemetery in Concord MA.

Maple Foliage, Concord MA